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Here is,

another addition to the series of things that took too long. But then they also say that it is never too late... VL was shipping with OSC and TUIO nodes from the beginning, but frankly, they were a bit cumbersome to use. So here is a new take on working with those two ubiquitous protocols:

OSC

Receiving OSC messages

To receive OSC messages you need to place an OSCServer node which you configure to the IP and Port you want to listen on. Immediately it will show you if it is receiving OSC messages at all on the Data Preview output.

Then use OSCReceiver nodes to listen to specific addresses. Either specify the address manually or, hit the "Learn" input to make the node listen to the address of the first OSC message it now receives.

Note, that the OSCReceiver is generic, meaning it'll connect to whatever datatype you want to receive. Supported typetags are:

  • i: Integer32, h: Integer64
  • f: Float32, d: Float64
  • s: String, c: Char
  • r: RGBA color
  • b: blob byte[]
  • T: true, F: false

In case of multiple floats, you can also directly receive them as vectors. And this works on spreads of the above types and even on tuples, in case you're receiving a message consisting of multiple different types.

Sending OSC messages

To send OSC messages you first need an OSCClient which you configure with a ServerIP and Port. Then you're using SendMessage nodes to specify the OSC address and arguments to send. Again note that the "Arguments" input is generic, so you can send any of the above types, spreads of those and even tuples combining different types!

By default, vvvv is collecting all the data you send and sends it out in bundles per frame. For optimal usage of UDP datagram size (depending on your network) you can even specify the maximum bundle size on the OSCClient node.

These are the basics. There are a couple of more things which are demonstrated in the howto patches!

TUIO

Receiving TUIO data

For receiving TUIO data you're using a TUIOClient which you configure to the IP and Port you want to listen on. The client already returns a spread of cursors, objects and blobs that you can readily access.

Sending TUIO data

For sending TUIO data you're using a TUIOTracker node which you configure with a ServerIP and Port. Then you give it a spread of cursors, objects and blobs to send out.


Available for testing now, in latest 2020.3 previews!

joreg, Wednesday, Dec 9th 2020 Digg | Tweet | Delicious 0 comments  

Hello everyone,

Introduction

I'd like to give you an update on the toolkit front, that vvvv has always been. While vvvv beta can be described as a dynamic system, mutating while you mold your patches, vvvv gamma and its workhorse VL are of a different kind. With VL we embraced features like

  • static typing with its ability to detect errors early,
  • .Net DLL import opening a universe of possibilities,
  • user-defined data types that interplay with those defined by others,
  • compilation with its ability to export an app as an executable...

In short, we embraced robust software developing strategies that at first seem to contradict the idea of a playful development toolkit that allows you to mold your app. We went for compiled patches, running, and hot-swapping them while you are building them.

But we envisioned vvvv to be both

  • the playful toolkit you fell in love with
  • combined with the promises of a compiled language

While my last blog post was about the language, let's focus on the toolkit this time.

Toolkit

Let's have a look at some features that allow you to interact with the VL runtime, the system that runs your patch while it allows you to edit it. The features here empower you to enrich the patching experience. We understand that these improvements need to "trickle up" into the libraries and only thereafter will have an effect for all users.

So the following is probably mostly interesting for advanced user and library developers.

Tracking Selection within the Patch Editor

You now can react to a selection within the patch editor. The more libraries do this the more playful the environment gets. We still have to figure out all the use cases, but here is a list of what's possible already

  • separate the core functionality from its Editor UI. Imagine a TimeLine node that is decoupled from the timeline editor.
  • an Inspector for nodes or pads
  • a Preview like this:
preview nodes
  • even the help browser itself uses the feature to provide help for the selected node.

And there is more:
You can get a Live Element for a certain Pin or Pad.

  • Copy the permanent identity of the element into the clipboard by CTRL-SHIFT-I (I stands for Identity).
  • GetLiveDataHubForSerializedID hands you the pin or pad.

useful for the cases where you want to always inspect a specific pin or pad of some patch. This can be helpful for debugging.

Let the Patch Editor navigate to a Patch

When a Skia Renderer is your active window, Ctrl-^ let's you jump to the patch in which it is used. This is handy when you opened a bunch of help patches and you want to see the help patch that is responsible for the output.

You can use the node ShowPatchOfNode to do the same trick.

Tooltips for your own data type

Here you can see a custom tooltip for a user patched type "Person".

A european

You now can patch your own tooltip with RegisterViewer. This way the patching experience will be so much more fun. We're in the process of adding more and more viewers for our types.

Runtime Warnings

Up to now, we had

  • Red elements: Static errors. (E.g. a node that can't be found) These errors make the compiler ignore certain parts in your program as they are currently in development. The rest still runs. (Something what C# and others just can't)
  • Orange socks on links: Static warnings, potential problems. Something to look at when searching for a bug.
  • Pink nodes: Runtime Errors. A problem that only got detected during runtime and which is such a big problem suddenly that the system can't work as planned. Some patches don't run as planned. There are different ways how to handle these, pointing you at problems at runtime, but they can be painful.

And now we introduce to you:

  • Orange nodes, Runtime Warnings: They show you a problem at runtime. But it doesn't harm your system as pink nodes do. Orange nodes are runtime warnings. Library developers can put warnings on their nodes in order to communicate to the user that something is slightly off.

You can try it yourself by using the Warn or the Warn (Reactive) node.

just a reminder

The warning will not only show up on the Warn node, but also on the applications of your patch.

S&R nodes

Sometimes it's just convenient to be able to send data from one patch to another without the need of feeding the data via pins. We now have send and receive nodes, like known from beta.
Features:

  • The channel can be anything. It doesn't have to be a string.
  • They have several warnings. E.g. for when none or many senders are on a channel that a receiver is listening to.

Descriptive Tree patching

Some libraries focus on a simple idea:
Let the user build an object graph that describes what he wants in a declarative manner and the library will do the hard work to follow that description.

a tree

Examples for this approach are

  • VL.Stride
  • VL.Elementa
  • to some extend VL.Skia

VL.Stride and VL.Elementa have in common that they focus on a very certain type of object graph: A tree made out of entities and components.
Libraries like these can now talk to the user and enforce the user to not build any kind of graph, but a tree-shaped graph (where one child doesn't have many parents).

VL.Stride uses TreeNodeParentManagers, Warn nodes and S&R nodes internally to the deliver this feature:

no tree. we get a runtime warning

You'll very soon be able to inspect those patches.

Help patches to all those topics will show up in the CoreLib API section (at the bottom of the listing).

We hope you'll enjoy these ways of integrating with the development env.
Thank you and we'll see you soon!

yours devvvvs

gregsn, Wednesday, Sep 23rd 2020 Digg | Tweet | Delicious 5 comments  

Did you ever wonder what the first things were, that the cool kids in the VL.Stride EarlyAccess program created with the new 3d rendering engine for vvvv gamma?

It's been only a few weeks, but stunning pixel combinations got posted into our early access chat room.

And we collected them in a gallery for you:

A big THANK YOU to everyone involved!

We can't wait to see what you will create with it. And don't miss the workshops at NODE20 if you want to learn how to use it.

We are looking forward to the public release as much as you do,
yours devvvvs

tonfilm, Sunday, Sep 20th 2020 Digg | Tweet | Delicious 0 comments  
Still life with cactus

In a quest to get more basic things working out of the box with VL (ie. using vvvv beta>=40 or the all-new vvvv gamma), we took on to support your favorite depth cameras. Most of the cameras and their APIs share basically the same features as a baseline and then some of them have a few extra features. This means that using them in vvvv works mostly the same for all of them.

You have the main device node that you connect ColorImage, DepthImage, PointCloud, Skeleton,... nodes to, to get the desired info out of them. See the help patches coming with the packs for details.

Here is a list and comparison of all available depth cameras with links to the respective packs on nuget.org. To learn how to use nuget packs with vvvv please watch HowTo use Nugets.

Kinect

The original Microsoft Kinect or the XBOX 360 that was released a bit later.
Get the VL pack on nuget.org.
Created with support by chaupow.

Pros

  • everyone has one at home
  • good enough for quick prototyping
  • can connect multiple to one PC
Cons

  • no longer produced
  • complicated cabling
  • skeleton tracking requires T-Pose to initialize

Kinect v2

The second version of the Microsoft Kinect.
Get the VL pack on nuget.org.
Created with support by ravazquez.

Pros

  • everyone has one at home
  • quite robust and performant skeleton tracking
Cons

  • no longer produced
  • complicated cabling
  • can only connect one per PC

Azure Kinect

The third version. AzureKinect.
Get the VL pack on nuget.org.
Get the VL pack for skeleton tracking on nuget.org.

Pros

  • easy cabling
  • does not require extra drivers to be installed
Cons

  • to this point rather slow skeleton tracking as compared to Kinect v2

Orbbec Astra

Orbbec Astra.
Get the VL pack on nuget.org.

Pros

  • easy cabling
  • small form factor
Cons

  • requires extra license for skeleton tracking

Intel RealSense

Intel RealSense.
Get the VL pack on nuget.org.

Pros

  • easy cabling
  • smallest form factor
  • highly configurable
  • built-in depth image filters
Cons

  • Skeleton tracking for now only in connection with Nuitrack (see below)

Nuitrack API

Nuitrack is a piece software that works with all of the above cameras and provides skeleton, hand and face tracking.
Get the VL pack on nuget.org.
Created with support by ravazquez.

Pros

  • a unified API for all of the above cameras
Cons

  • requires extra license for skeleton tracking
  • can only handle one camera at a time
  • weird setup and configuration

Leap Motion Controller

The Leap Motion Controller device provides hand and finger tracking.
Get the VL pack on nuget.org.

Pros

  • for precise and close-up hand and finger tracking
Cons


Please help us improve this list of pros and cons. Know any other or disagree with some mentioned, please add them in the comments! This could eventually grow into a page of the gray book.

joreg, Monday, Jul 27th 2020 Digg | Tweet | Delicious 3 comments  

Here we go,

this is vvvv beta40, combining the coziness of vvvv beta with the latest version of VL - the self proclaimed "future of visual programming".

Highlights of this release:

  • A fix for working with Spout and DX11
  • Update to the latest version of VL

Through the integration with the latest version of VL, we're now again on par with the VL version that comes with vvvv gamma. This means that with vvvv beta40 you can now use the same latest versions of nugets, that you can use with the vvvv gamma 2020.1.x series.

Why should you update? Because this gives you access to the latest developments on these libraries:

  • VL.OpenCV
  • VL.Audio
  • VL.MediaFoundation
  • VL.Elementa
  • VL.Devices.RealSense
  • VL.Devices.Astra
  • VL.Devices.Kinect
  • VL.Devices.Kinect2
  • VL.Devices.AzureKinect
  • VL.Devices.Nuitrack
  • VL.Devices.LeapOrion
  • VL.Devices.WinTab

and so many more.

To learn how to install nugets please consult this documentation.

joreg, Tuesday, Jul 7th 2020 Digg | Tweet | Delicious 0 comments  

Evvvveryone,

is happy, that we're finally looking at a candidate for beta40, which will ship with the latest and may i say greatest integration of VL to date that is 2020.1.4!

For the latest changes in VL, please consult the vvvv gamma series 2020.1.X changelog.

Most notably this gives you access to all the latest goodies that are popping up as .NET nugets lately. Yes, we're still missing a convenient overview of those, but meanwhile a search for VL on .nuget.org gives you an idea. Still wondering how to use those? Watch this tutorial on How to use Nugets to find out.

So please test this against your current projects. Make sure that everything is running as expected. If not, please leave a comment below or let us know in the forum.

Download

vvvv beta40 x64 RC2
vvvv beta40 x86 RC2

Changelog for Candidates

RC2

  • now using latest RCPSharp, allowing the Rabbit again to listen on 0.0.0.0
joreg, Tuesday, Jun 23rd 2020 Digg | Tweet | Delicious 1 comments  

Hello everyone!

We are pleased to announce that from now on VL language design ideas will be specified in public.
This allows you to see

  • which areas we identified to work on (quests)
  • what ideas we came up with to fix those issues (proposals)
  • which proposals got favored over other proposals (decisions)
  • which proposals got moved onto which milestone

But it also allows you to join forces with us. Since in the end, it's all about your patches, we appreciate your feedback.

We decided to start clean: For now, we didn't throw all our language ideas into this repository. In its current state, we only see issues that came up in the last days, so the selection of issues is quite incomplete. Other ideas that might be more important and didn't come up in these days will eventually make it there as soon as they come up again.

We'll address quests by you or us with proposals that might be fresh or have been around for some time. We'll try to communicate different approaches and the pros and cons. And we'll try to single out very few issues that are just too promising to not having a shot at. Changing the language is quite hard, so expect an insane ratio of proposalsThatSoundNice / featuresComingSoon.

We were quite impressed by how this was handled by the C# Language Design Team. So we copied the approach.

Sometimes it's hard to distinguish between the language and ways of expression within the language. You just search for a way to address a certain problem. How would I structure my patches? We'll allow these so-called design patterns to be discussed in this repository as we want the language to be able to follow well-established ideas on how to solve certain types of problems. Here is an example.

But for now: Welcome to the club! \o/

gregsn, Thursday, Jun 18th 2020 Digg | Tweet | Delicious 4 comments  

helo evvvveryone,

this is vvvv beta39.1, a bug-fix release. It does not yet include the anticipated update to latest VL, which we save for upcoming beta40. We just want to get another stable version out before such a bigger update that including latest VL will mean.

Remember that via VL you have access to many more goodies. Here is a convenient list of VL nugets that work with this release. To learn how to install nugets please consult this documentation and then use these commands to install them:

Nugets requiring a specific version to work with beta39.1
(To use the latest version of these nugets you'll have to wait for upcoming beta40 or use gamma2020.1)

 nuget install VL.OpenCV -Version 0.2.141-alpha
 nuget install VL.Devices.Kinect2 -Version 0.1.45-alpha
 nuget install VL.Devices.Realsense -Version 0.1.7-alpha
 nuget install VL.GStreamer -Version 1.0.18-gadcd7f95e5
Nugets that do not require a specific version, but still the prerelease flag:

 nuget install VL.Audio -pre
 nuget install VL.IO.M2MQTT -pre
 nuget install VL.IO.NetMQ -pre
 nuget install VL.2D.DollarQ -pre
 nuget install VL.2D.Voronoi -pre
 nuget install VL.Animation.ParticleSystem -pre
 nuget install VL.ColorBlender -pre
 nuget install VL.ColorThief -pre
Nugets that have a proper release already and thus don't require the prerelease flag:

 nuget install VL.DBSCAN
 nuget install VL.StringExtensions
 nuget install VL.2D.Simplify
 nuget install VL.InfluxDB

If you have other public nugets that you tested to work with this release, please post them in the comments below!

joreg, Tuesday, May 5th 2020 Digg | Tweet | Delicious 0 comments  

helo evvvveryone,

we're preparing for a vvvv beta39.1 release and here is a first release candidate. As you'll see in the change-log it is a rather minor update with only fixes. It does not yet include the anticipated update to latest VL, which we save for upcoming beta40. We just want to get another stable version out before such a bigger update that including latest VL will mean.

Remember that via VL you have access to many more goodies. Here is a convenient list of VL nugets that work with this release. To learn how to install nugets please consult this documentation and then use these commands to install them:

Nugets requiring a specific version to work with beta39.1
(To use the latest version of these nugets you'll have to wait for upcoming beta40 or use gamma2020.1)

 nuget install VL.OpenCV -Version 0.2.141-alpha
 nuget install VL.Devices.Kinect2 -Version 0.1.45-alpha
 nuget install VL.Devices.Realsense -Version 0.1.7-alpha
 nuget install VL.GStreamer -Version 1.0.18-gadcd7f95e5
Nugets that do not require a specific version:

 nuget install VL.Audio -pre
 nuget install VL.IO.M2MQTT -pre
 nuget install VL.IO.NetMQ -pre
 nuget install VL.2D.DollarQ -pre
 nuget install VL.2D.Voronoi -pre

If you have other public nugets that you tested to work with this release, please post them in the comments so we can all mention them in the upcoming release notes!

Download

vvvv beta39.1 x64 RC1
vvvv beta39.1 x86 RC1

And as always, please test and report your findings!

joreg, Wednesday, Apr 22nd 2020 Digg | Tweet | Delicious 1 comments  

This is my talk at Ircam earlier this year, where I tried to introduce vvvv gamma to an audience not necessarily familiar with vvvv but most likely already with the idea of visual programming. Given the fact that Ircam was the birthplace of Max and PD which are still both in heavy use there.

In 25 minutes I tried to give a glimpse at vvvv by focusing on four things that I believe make it shine:

  • Loops
  • Multithreading
  • Object Oriented Patching
  • Extensibility

Also I pretended that it is completely normal to already have a 3d engine with it...

For talk description and recording of other talks see: https://medias.ircam.fr/xcc0abe

joreg, Sunday, Apr 19th 2020 Digg | Tweet | Delicious 5 comments  

anonymous user login

Shoutbox

~22h ago

nanotekt: a brief VL.stride study https://youtu.be/B2Nlz5VZ9lM ...and a massive 'thank you' to the devvvvs!

~1d ago

everyoneishappy: @overtones this would require 4D noise, which is possible but not implemented in Fieldtrip

~4d ago

overtones: Hi! SF2D has Time & DomainOffset inputs, but SF3D only DomainOffset. Is there a way to use Time in SF3D or it makes no sense? Thx

~7d ago

joreg: @SabrinaVerhage this could be useful for you next "hacking sex" workshop: https://buttplug.io they have a .NET nuget for use in vvvv!

~15d ago

ravazquez: Happy new year!

~15d ago

sunep: Happy new year everyone!

~18d ago

ggml: confirmed. thanks

~19d ago

david: @ggml fixed. please try again.

~19d ago

joreg: @ggml confirmed. we'll investigate..

~20d ago

ggml: node workshops on talque seem to be no longer available