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hi there,

beta37 is done - as far as we know. Now, please help us to find out!

Try the release candidate - link at the bottom - by opening the project you're currently working on and see if it opens timely, patching is responsive and everything works correctly. If not, please let us know in the forum using the alpha tag.

Release Highlights

Cleanup and cleanup tools

This one can be understood as a late spring cleaning.

To get the desired appearance in the node browser we at times needed to resort, rename and polish nodes and types without changing much in terms of functionality. There were other examples though where we refined some major bits in the basic node set - e.g. file IO and serialization nodes got a complete rework and just got so much easier to use. And we made sure that the core library feels more explorable just by making basic nodes more visible than others. Advanced, experimental or obsolete nodes now don't hide in different packages but can be opted into the list of nodes, while browsing the library. Within that process, we also polished the node browser quite a bit.

But this release also comes with features for you to clean up. Frames help to structure patches in a visual way, groups, and categories in a structural way. You even can tweak the visibility of your nodes in the node browser and by that distinguish rather advanced or still experimental nodes from the daily node set. Library developers will also love the feature to make certain helper nodes internal so that they are free to change or delete them at any time in the future.

A lighter VL

Startup speed got improved. Also, there are less VL documents open making the navigation menu more meaningful. Let me not begin with the much lighter ".Net Packages" menu or the much lighter download size. Process nodes now opt for mutation which makes them lighter in terms of memory allocation.

Entry points and document management

Together these features allow this workflow:

  • Drop VL documents onto vvvv or VL to open them. They start running.
  • To make them go away use the "close document feature Ctrl-F4" in the VL document menu.

In essence, this allows to do example patches, tutorials or help patches - an essential feature that will make future libraries so much easier to learn. To have a patch start on document load, create a non-generic process called "Root" in the document patch. So again from the end user perspective: no need to create a node in vvvv to see the patch running.

Ctrl-W now behaves like in an internet browser: It just closes the tab - closing the last tab closes the VL window. Ctrl-W doesn't ask you to save the document though. Closing a tab doesn't close the document, it just closes the view onto the specific patch within the document.
If you now managed to hide the VL window use the "Show VL" command in the vvvv main menu to get back into VL.

Debugging

Debugging should feel much more intuitive, as it now allows to inspect the exact state of the patches for the moment when something went wrong.

Some notes on the debugging settings:

  • RuntimePauseOnError: When turned on, allows to inspect nodes and pins above the pink node. You see the values for when the exception occurred. For end users, this feature typically is off. Library developers will likely switch this often depending on whether they're debugging or using their library. Reloading the settings now always should work. No need to restart when switching the setting.
  • RuntimeAutoJumpToError: if the auto panning gets in the way this is the setting to turn off.

You can switch the settings via Quad menu -> Settings -> Open in editor.

Cache region

Actually we never really told you about how amazing the Cache region is. If you have any node that you want to perform better, ask yourself if it wouldn't be enough to only compute it when the input changes and then cache the computed results. The cache region allows expressing this easily. The cache region actually got added with beta36, but now the interplay with other constructs works better.

Loops for example now output their spreads in a way that the changed-detection of a downstream connected Changed node or Cache region only triggers if the slices actually changed from frame to frame.

Some of this stuff may for sure sound pretty special interest, but we have the feeling that these details matter in the end for having an expressive but playful language.

Baby, don’t make me spell it out for you

All in all this release makes VL easier to learn, use and develop for.

VVVV

HTMLTexture now for DX11 and more

VL

VL: Corelib Cleanup
VL: Frame Your Patches
VL: Groups and Categories
VL: Serialization
VL: Improved File IO

for an in-depth list of changes have a look at the changelog.

Download

Release Candidate 6
64-bit
vvvv
addons
32-bit
vvvv
addons
Beware: Make sure you secure your data. Patches saved with an alpha might lead to not being able to open them with the former beta.

gregsn, Friday, Aug 24th 2018 Digg | Tweet | Delicious 26 comments  

Not many will remember the times when vvvv's 3d rendering was based on Direct3D 8. Not important really, because at the same time we released vvvv 33beta1 in December 2002, Microsoft released Direct3D 9 with a lot of new features, so we knew what we had to do..

Luckily vvvv's DX9 implementation proved powerful enough to be quite useful for many years. Then it took Microsoft 5 years to release its successor DX10 which was only available on Windows Vista, which nobody wanted. Also graphic-card adoption took quite a while so we didn't really feel an urge to start working on it right away.

A Gift

A year later in 2008 Microsoft released Windows 7 and with it DX11, which altogether looked more promising. But still a lack of adoption of supported hardware and Windows 7 didn't put too much pressure on us to implement it. Instead we thought it would be smarter to improve the plugin-interface for vvvv to make it easier for users to contribute to the library of nodes.

In parallel we had already secretly started work on our next big thing that would become VL, which we first announced at the keynode during NODE13. Since with VL we've mentioned from the beginning that we wanted it to eventually run across platforms, for us, implementing a new renderer based on the windows-only Direct3D api became less and less appealing.

What happened next couldn't have been more fortunate: besides many other major contributions, using the possibilities of vvvv's plugin-interface, power-user vux took it in his own hands to create a set of nodes for rendering with the features of DX11, which he released on vvvv's 10th birthday in December 2012. And the vvvvorld was a better place.

DX11 for vvvv is amazing, but innovation in the world of computer graphics started moving faster and faster. Despite the magic that DX11 brought, users demanded more and more bling, but all we were talking about was how VL would revolutionize visual-programming, which brought us all together in the first place.

Another Gift?

With the cross-platform goal in mind, for years it seemed the only option was going for OpenGL instead of Direct3D as rendering API for VL. But all those years, following OpenGLs development and stories about bad support by Microsoft and Apple never got us excited enough to just go for it. Meanwhile a new player has appeared as a modern cross-platform graphics API, called Vulkan, but since it is still in its early stages and support for MacOS seems not official yet, again we were reluctant to jump on it.

All the years we knew there would be another option: Instead of using Direct3D, OpenGL or Vulkan directly, we could base a rendering library for VL on a game-engine API that would deal with different graphics APIs under the hood and would possibly have all 3 as back-ends that can be used on different platforms without us needing to worry about it.

While this sounds brilliant, it obviously has other potential drawbacks (out of scope for this post). But also the range of options for game-engines we could have used wasn't too overwhelming. Until recently. Enter Xenko.

Xenko is a universe of its own and as such comparable to Unity3D, UnrealEngine, CryEngine and the GodotEngine. Please check Xenko's propaganda page to get a glimpse of its features.

We've had an eye on this engine for a while already but it being targeted at commercial game-studios would mean that every user of vl would also need to buy a license for it, so again we were hesitating and looked for alternatives.

But what just happened could again not have been more fortunate: The company behind Xenko, Silicon Studio, removed its commercial licensing and released it to the community under the MIT license, which is a very permissive open source license. This would allow us to base a renderer for VL on it without any licensing restrictions.

Xenko and VL

Initial tests look very promising. Within just a few days we were able to patch a little interactive scene and export the project as an executable so it could be distributed via the Steam store and run on a VR device.

Hence our plan is to investigate further in this direction and at the moment we see two interesting workflows between VL and Xenko:

  • a VL.Xenko pack: that would be basically like the VL.Skia pack we've just released
  • Xenko Studio as a host for VL: that would be similar to how vvvv is hosting VL at the moment

For both scenarios what will be important, is a proper library design wrapping the original Xenko functionality into a comfortable set of nodes, similar to what we just did for Skia.

Next Steps

We'd usually not water your mouths before we are more sure about things. But with Xenko just having gone full open-source and looking to build a community of developers and users, we thought it would be a good idea to talk about this now and try to involve you from the beginning.

So if you're curious about Xenko's universe, just head over to its website and see what it has to offer. You can even download and play around with the editor and if you're familiar with C# create a little game with fancy graphics and assets in no time.

Next we'll demo what we've got so far to participants at LINK and start a discussion there. If you're not at LINK please still join the discussion with your thoughts using this thread. If all goes well we should also be able to share our proof of concept sometime after LINK.

So we hope you understand that at this stage it is too early to promise anything but at the moment we are confident to having found the right library for implementing a 3d rendering system for VL. Just as we were happy when we finally found Skia as the perfect library for VLs 2d rendering system.

Meanwhile please help spread the word about Xenko, retweet their announcement and consider supporting their Patreon to help them build a strong developer community.

We'll update you about developments as we progress...

joreg, Thursday, Aug 2nd 2018 Digg | Tweet | Delicious 11 comments  

Skia is a modern and fast 2d rendering library. As usual, we stand upon the shoulders of giants when making this functionality available to you: the core Skia technology and the .Net binding "SkiaSharp". The VL.Skia package aims to make all of this functionality available within VL in an easy-to-use high-level node set.

You now can have the first glimpse on it. From the start, it comes with a nice stack of tutorials and example patches. This package is done for vvvvbeta37.

Here is a rough overview of what the key concepts are:


Layers and Renderers

Just like known from vvvv the main idea is that layers can be grouped and can be connected to a renderer to draw them. Most Layers come with a Bounds input OR Position and Size and Anchor.

We offer different renderers:

  • Renderer: this one comes with a window
  • Renderer (OffScreen): outputs an image that can be drawn with DrawImage or converted to an IImage via ToImage. Here is what you can do with an IImage.
  • SVGWriter, PDFWriter: they take a Layer and write an SVG or PDF file to disk
A Layer connected to a Renderer

Paint

Every layer comes with a Paint input. It describes how to draw the layer. This is very comparable to the render states in DX9/DX11.

You can stack the Paint-modifying nodes. Nodes like SetColor would take everything from the incoming paint and only adjust the color.

Stroke sets up some paint properties

Shaders, Filters, and PathEffects are all properties of Paint. 1000 words wouldn't be enough to describe what you can do with them. You probably just need to play with them a bit.

What can I say

Text

Text nodes are also just Layers. You can think of them as text boxes.

Within that rectangular region you now can adjust horizontal and vertical alignment. This is done via properties of Paint. The FontAndParagraph node allows to conveniently adjust several text related paint properties in one go.

You can visualize the text box with the Show Helpers pin of FontAndParagraph.

(See the examples\3_Text for how to do word wrapping etc.)


Transforms

Layers can be transformed. This allows you to patch a Camera. You would then connect your scene to the Camera and the camera to the renderer.

Transforms are not that important as in 3D rendering frameworks as all Layers already can be placed.
Scaling a Layer influences the stroke width. If this is unwanted specify the Size on the layer itself and not via transform node.
Everything scales. Also the stroke

Spaces

We designed the library in a way that it works for different scenarios. Sometimes you would like to think in a normalized space, like known from DX9/DX11. In other scenarios, you want to think pixel- or device-independent-pixel-based.
You can choose the space on the renderer. But you can also combine spaces: With the WithinCommonSpace node you can adjust the space for everything upstream. By that, you could have a game that adjusts its content depending on the size of the renderer and still draw some text top-left with a constant text size no matter how big the renderer is. (See examples\1_Basics\08_Spaces-Overview for more details)

Top Left - Device Independent Pixels

Interaction

Layers in Skia can be interactive. The main idea here is: "What you see is what you want to interact with". So if the layer is interactive, connecting it to the renderer in one way or the other means that it will be drawn AND that you can interact with it. (See examples\5_Interaction)

This part is under construction still.
Button is just a experimental proof of concept node

How to install

In order to use this library with VL, you have to install the NuGet that is available via nuget.org. For information on how to use NuGets with VL, see Managing NuGets in the VL documentation. In short, navigate via document menu to Dependencies -> Manage NuGets -> Commandline and then type:

nuget install VL.Skia -prerelease -Source nuget.org

As long as we don't have an example browser here is how to get them via windows explorer:

VVVVDir\lib\packs\VL.Skia...\examples

Drag & drop an example patch onto vvvv or VL. For closing the example use the X on the renderer or hit Ctrl-F4 on the VL patch.

Happy exploring!

Yours,
Devvvvs

gregsn, Saturday, Jul 28th 2018 Digg | Tweet | Delicious 30 comments  

Serialization in VL has drastically been simplified by introducing two new nodes called Serialize and Deserialize in the category System.Serialization.
Let's first have a look at two basic examples:

Serialize takes any value and serializes it into a XElement while Deserialize does the exact opposite, it takes a XElement and turns it into a value of the requested output type.

As you can see from the screenshot the resulting string is very short and contains only the mimimum amount of data. It achieves that tidyness by only serializing user defined properties, skipping properties which have the default value, making use of XML attributes, putting collections of primitive values into comma separated strings and adding type information only when necessary.

When deserializing the system will try to apply the serialized content on the instance to be created. This makes it very resilient to future patch changes as adding or removing properties and to some extend even changing the type of a property will just work.

Serializers are provided for all primtive types (Boolean, Integer32, Float32, etc.), collection types (Array, Spread, Dictionary, etc.), commonly used imported types (Vector2/3/4, Matrix, Color, etc.) and most importantly all patched types. If a serializer should be missing for a certain type either report it to us or keep on reading to the next section where you learn how to patch (or write) your own serializer.

Paired with the new files nodes serialization to disk is straight forward:

That's basically all there is to know from an end-user perspective. You can try these new nodes in the latest alpha versions.

Writing a custom serializer

Even though VL ships with serializers for the most common types the situation could still arise where a custom serializer has to be written - either because it's simply missing for the type in question or one is not satisfied with the output of the already existing serializer.

Creating a custom serializer consists of two steps

  1. Patching (or writing in C#) the serializer by implementing the ISerializer<T> interface using the advanced Serialize and Deserialize nodes working on the SerializationContext
  2. Registering that serializer using the advanced RegisterSerializer node inside the static RegisterServices operation (more on that in an upcoming blog post)

Here are two screenshots of the above from an example implementation which can be found in the VL.CoreLib/help/Serialization.vl file:

We're looking forward to your feedback.

Happy serialization!

Elias, Wednesday, Jul 18th 2018 Digg | Tweet | Delicious 5 comments  

Dear patcher,

as an avid vl user by now you've understood that in vl there are different kinds of patches. While colloquially we just call them all patches for simplicity and because they all allow you to patch in them, we can easily distinguish two main types of patches:

  • Datatype Patches: patches defining a process node and/or datatype
  • Structural Patches: patches that only help you structure your programs

While datatype patches more resemble what we had in vvvv, structural patches are new in vl. We just reworked this part a litte and ended up with 3 structural patches which make things much more clear:

  • Group
  • Category
  • FullCategory

But before we go on let's make sure we are on par regarding the term "Category":

When we read TogEdge [Control], that means there is a node named "TogEdge" in the category "Control". Also categories are what we see in the NodeBrowser. They can be nested, like Animation.FrameBased and in general they are our friends.

Obviously. (Yeah, just wanted to make sure)

What we had so far was a not so clear mix of all three. Let's see what we have in latest alpha:

Group

Group patches simply allow you to create more space in a patch by opening a new canvas. The groups name is merely used for human readability, vl doesn't care about it at all. Create a group by typing "group" in the nodebrowser. Groups is what you will be mostly using in your daily project-patching work.

Inside a group patch
Group patch from the outside

Category

A Category patch looks quite similar to the group, only its name has a meaning: The name appends itself to the category of its parent patch. That way you can build up any category hierarchy, that you then see in the NodeBrowser. Multiple category levels are allowed with dot notation. e.g. MyCat1.MyCat2.

Inside a category patch
Category patch from the outside

Full Category

A Full Category patch is similar to the Category patch, only that it doesn't add its category to the parent. By that you can place nodes in any category, regardless of the parent patch. It's considered bad practice to do that, but is useful to add nodes to an existing category like Collections.Spread, for example. Multiple category levels are allowed with dot notation. e.g. MyParentCat.MySubCat.

Inside a full category patch
Full category patch from the outside

Each vl document can directly start a category, which you can define in the angular brackets in the top left corner of the document patch.

"Voo" specified as a documents category

Changing the Patch Type

You can easily convert a group patch into a category patch and vice versa by the patch type enum. Note how the label changes and represents the actual category structure:

Converting a group into a category

Setting Categories on Node-Definitions

As if the above didn't offer enough options already there is one more way to specify a category for an operation or a datatype definition:

Setting a Category on an datatype or operation-definition

Happy node sorting!

tonfilm, Thursday, Jul 5th 2018 Digg | Tweet | Delicious 9 comments  

Some things take a while longer...
Planned since vvvv pre-beta1 we're happy to finally bring you:

Frames

Patches tend to do different things all at once and when looking at them it is often not clear at first sight which part of a patch does what. We have comments to add a few words at certain spots but those fail when we'd like to point at a group of nodes that do a certain thing. So the idea is to have a visual element we can place in a patch to frame a group of nodes and mark them with a color and label. This will help us to better structure and document large patches.

Press ALT while making a selction to create a frame and optionally give it a title
When selected, the frame shows a color-box
Move and size the frame

Frames are always in the very back of everything. They don't contain any other elements and they cannot be contained in other regions. They are mere visual elements and don't interfere with the functionality of a patch in any way.

Grab the frame at the color-box to move its content along

To show/hide all frames in a patch at once, press CTRL+ALT+F.
To frame a bunch of selected nodes, press ALT+F.

Screenshots

Besides being structural elements, frames also allow you to take screenshots easily and repeatably. We're using this e.g. to automate generating screenshots for our documentation...

Here is how:

  • Press the Printer button to make a screenshot, then rightclick it to see the captured file in explorer
    • Alternatively press CTRL+2 to take a shot of the selected frame
  • Press CTRL+5 to take screenshots of all frames in a document at once

To create a quick screenshot of an area without even creating a frame, simply press S while making a selection. This will copy the screenshot to the clipboard (so you can simply paste it into the chat or a forum reply) and also place a .png next to the current .vl document.

Recordings

Apart from single screenshots you can also record an animated gif of the area of a frame, here is how:

  • Press the Record button to start a recording, the same button again or ESC to stop it
    • Alternatively toggle CTRL+4 to start/stop recording the selected frame

Note that the resulting .gifs are quite large. This is a known problem that shall be fixed at some point.

Screenspace Frame

One more: In case you want to make a recording that includes panning or zooming in the patch you can create a frame in screenspace:

Press ALT+SHIFT while making a selection to create a frame in screenspace
joreg, Wednesday, Jun 27th 2018 Digg | Tweet | Delicious 11 comments  

Here is to inform you about an update to general File input/output in VL available for testing in latest alphas today. Introduced 1.5years ago we've now completely reworked this from the ground up with the things we've learned so far.

Blocking

We noticed that even though obviously you'll often want file io to be non-blocking, there are cases where blocking makes sense. So we now give you the following:

FileReader, FileReader (String), JSONReader, XMLReader
FileWriter, FileWriter (String), JSONWriter, XMLWriter

These are the most simple to use, very close to the comparable vvvv versions, only without error reporting, which we explain below.

Non-Blocking

In the case we want to have our file io non-blocking we learned that most likely we don't only want to load the file but often also do some kind of "transformation" to the data before it is used further in the patch. Most likely this transformation should also be non-blocking and we only want to be informed when that part is done as well. Introducing:

Read: Foreach file read, parse its content and pass it on.
HoldLatest returns the last data pushed to it.
On Data bangs when new data is available.

Instead of returning the actual data of a file, those readers return an Observable<Data> which allows you to do some further processing to the data before you get access to it in the patch using a HoldLatest node. For more information on working with observables see the chapter Reactive.

The writers in turn also take an Observable<Data> and write whenever new data is pushed through the observable. Like this you can e.g. write data received from an input via an observable directly to a file without ever touching the mainloop:

Read: Foreach Payload received via UDP, append to file result.txt

Naming Convention

While in vvvv we had different names for file accessing nodes, like: Reader (Raw), FileTexture (EX9.Texture), XFile (EX9.Geometry Load), MP3Parser (File), ... we decided on a new naming scheme for VL:

  • all readers end on "Reader"
  • all writers end on "Writer"
  • the node is prefixed with a hint at the file-format it handles, like XMLReader, JSONReader
  • more generic readers that don't read a specific format are called more generically, like FileReader, ImageReader, ..

Like this, typing "reader" or "writer" in the nodebrowser, you'll be guaranteed to find all available readers and writers.

Error Handling

Reading or writing files can go wrong for different reasons and the system needs a way to inform you about this. Previously, error handling of reader/writer nodes was inconsistent. Some ignored errors, others reported "Success" or returned an "Error Message". Having realized error-handling has to be supported on a higher-level than individually on every node, we have now removed all error handling from those nodes.

Now what? Right, so the first thing you need to know: If an error occurs at runtime it will be catched by vl and the node will go pink, informing you of the problem. Often this is enough.

In case you want to react to an error in your patch we again have to differentiate between the blocking and non-blocking case:

Blocking

The solution for the blocking case involves using the experimental Try [Control] region and looks like this:

The experimental Try region catches the error that occured

Non-Blocking

In a non-blocking scenario you can use the HoldLatestError [Reactive] node like this:

HoldLatestError bangs and returns an error message
joreg, Saturday, Jun 23rd 2018 Digg | Tweet | Delicious 3 comments  

Growing a consistent library of nodes and presenting it in a clear way in the NodeBrowser is one of the great challenges we are facing. For the upcoming release we made this our focus: Clean up the core library vl offers and add new features to the NodeBrowser for easier browsing. So here is what you get:

Filtering by Aspects

The NodeBrowser got a couple of new toggle buttons that let you filter for different aspects. Aspects include "Advanced", "Experimental", "Obsolete"...

Node list filter buttons

Button layout: Time goes from left to right (Obsolete -> Experimental), high level to low level from up to down (Basic -> Advanced).
By default you see all normal nodes, ie. those without any aspect. This is what we consider the 80% most important nodes for the casual user. Browsing the categories with this setting should give you a good, not too overwhelming overview of what functionality is available. For example it excludes all nodes using types we consider advanced, like Float64, Integer64,... mutable collections (like Array, ..) and often nodes that we hope you'd not have to use every day.

Browsing the "Primitive" Category

Advanced

If you're looking for a node and it doesn't show up you can enable the "Advanced" aspect. This will include many more nodes. Obviously the distinction between normal and advanced is very subjective and will vary widely for different users and use-cases. So we are aware that there is room for debate and nodes may be moved between normal and advanced in future versions. The good thing about this is that such a move between aspects never breaks any patches!
You can toggle this filter button with the TAB key.

Experimental

Includes nodes that we haven't yet fully committed to. Use those at your own risk. We don't guarantee that they'll still work the same in future versions

Obsolete

Includes nodes that we only still ship to not break existing patches. Don't use them in new patches. Most likely there is a better version of the node available already.

Internal

Nodes can have the "Internal" aspect set, meaning they are only visible within their .vl document but don't get exposed. So if another document references the first one, it will only see nodes that are not Internal. Using the toggle you can hide those internal nodes from the NodeBrowser to have a view on the node set that other documents would see.

Defaults

The default setting for the filter buttons for Advanced, Experimental and External on startup of VL can be adjusted in the settings.xml file. If you are working a lot with .dlls from c# projects and you need to restart often, you probably want to enable the 'External' button by default.

Assign Aspects to Nodes

For information about assigning nodes to aspects, see this gray book section and feel free to open a thread in the forums for specific questions.

Filter externals

When referencing an external .dll it often leads to a very large number of extra nodes in the NodeBrowser. Using the "External" toggle you can decide whether to see those in the NodeBrowser or not. Also the NodeBrowser is faster when it doesn't have to deal with those.
You can toggle this filter button with the SHIFT+TAB keyboard shortcut.

Stateful Nodes

Aka process nodes got merged with their stateless siblings with the same name. If there is a process node and a stateless node with the same name you get a "..." icon in the NodeBrowser and after clicking on it you have to choose which one you want.

More Collections

This category got the most rework so it's worth to mention its specific changes here.

VL encourages the use of immutable collections because they work very well together with the data flow paradigm. But when working with .NET libraries you often have to deal with mutable collections, so we now provide all commonly used collections of the .NET framework!

In general we try to do as little renaming as possible when importing data types. But for the collections we took the liberty to do the following renamings from the original ones:

All immutable .NET collections drop the Immutable pre-fix since it's the default in VL:

  • ImmutableArray -> Array
  • ImmutableDictionary -> Dictionary
  • ...
All mutable .NET collections get a Mutable pre-fix:

  • Array -> MutableArray
  • Dictionary -> MutableDictionary
  • ...

All interfaces for collections moved into the Interfaces sub-category and we introduced a Common category that contains data types and nodes that are used together with collections like KeyValuePair or CustomEqualityComparer.

Rectangle Improvements

The nodes to create rectangles are much more flexible now. You can specify the size of the rectangle and an anchor position. Depending on the enum input Anchor, the position gets interpreted as any one of the significant points in a rectangle, like TopLeft, Center, BottomRight, ... Also the split node got this enum to specify which point of the rectangle the output position should be.

Additionally there is a node to create a rectangle spanned by two points and one to create a rectangle by the coordinate values of it's edges.

We also added Inflate and Scale nodes. Inflate can offset the rectangle edges in each direction by specific amount and Scale multiplies the size of the Rectangle in each direction. Both nodes come with version Centered and Uniform which assign the same value to the horizontal and vertical direction or the same value for all directions.

Easier switch from Adaptive to specific

Some nodes (like the +,..) that you place in a patch are not tied to a specific type (like Float32) unless you make a connection to them. This is a very useful feature in vl and works 99% of times. Sometimes though you are smarter than the compiler and you want to specify to use a concrete implementation. In this case, after placing the node you now simply have to double click it to get all available options and chose one of those.

Destroy is now Dispose

In general we're planning to stick as close as possible to the naming in the .NET world. This will make VL more inviting for external developers to join and also makes documentation more easy to find. Therefore we decided to rename "Disposable" back to "IDisposable" and "Destroy" back to "Dispose".

As always, head over to the alpha builds and report your findings.
Enjoy the new order and happy patching!

yours,
devvvvs

tonfilm, Thursday, Jun 7th 2018 Digg | Tweet | Delicious 4 comments  

just because!

since we can, the addonpack is now shipping with 4 new nodes:

  • HTMLTexture (DX11.Texture String CEF)
  • HTMLTexture (DX11.Texture Url CEF)
  • HTMLView (Image String)
  • HTMLView (Image Url)

What happened here is that the original EX9 based HTMLTextures have been replaced by the more generic HTMLView (Image) nodes which can easily be used for both EX9 and DX11 via the respective UploadTexture nodes introduced recently. So the EX9 and DX11 variants of the HTMLTexture nodes are now mere modules wrapping HTMLView -> UploadTexture.

The 'CEF' in the version for the DX11 modules is to have them distinguished from the also available contribution HTMLTexture (DX11) by gumilastik, with the same name, which is internally using a different backend than CEF. So horray, more choices for you!

Just in case you wonder: Obviously the DX11 variants still require the DX11 Pack to work!

And while at it we also updated the underlying backend to reflect Chromium 66.0.3359.117

Bonustrack:
With the Image nodes you can also pipe websites into the recently introduced VL.OpenCV. This maybe quite special interest but i'm sure one fine day someone will need to do exactly that:

HTMLView verwurstelt via VL.OpenCV and displayed via Preview (DX11.Texture)). Thankyouverymuch!

Available in latest alphas now. Please test and report your findings!

joreg, Thursday, May 31st 2018 Digg | Tweet | Delicious 8 comments  

Welcome dear patchers to a new episode of devvvvs giving you control over your PC mainboard.

When you work in vvvv or VL the evaluation of your patch is automatically driven by a mainloop. It executes the nodes in your patch (usually) 60 times per second and by this allows changes to happen in your patch over time.

If you have a look at the PerfMeter in a renderer with a mainloop timer without any tweaks you will see lots of flickering like this:

Those flickers indicate that the time between two frames of the mainloop is changing a bit every frame. In an ideal world those flickers would not be there and the time between two frames would always be the same. An unstable mainloop like this creates jitter in animations, drops video frames and lets the visual output of your patch look less smooth.

It's quite a difficult task to get high-precision timer events on a modern computer architecture. Timers and me go way back to the early vvvv days at MESO when i worked on the vvvv mainloop and the Filtered time mode. Since then we could improve the vvvv mainloop time stability quite a bit by doing tricks like changing the windows system timer resolution and introducing a short busy wait phase at the end of the mainloop. The result of this work looks like this:

The experience gathered from the vvvv mainloop improvements is now available in the VL library, so you can build your own sub-mainloops.

But why would you need your own timer at all if you have a good mainloop already? There are a few reasons:

  • Have a second mainloop on a different thread to split performance or don't block the mainloop
  • Process something at a slower rate as the mainloop to save performance, e.g. web requests every few seconds
  • Process something at a higher rate as the mainloop, e.g. output to a micro controller or servo motor
  • Run parts of your patch in it's own mainloop to avoid blocking user input from vvvv

General Node Design

In VL the patch of a process node by default has a Create and an Update operation. Create gets called once an instance of the process is created and Update gets called periodically by the mainloop. In this process node patch you can place other process nodes that 'plug into' those two operations by placing their own Create on the Create of the surrounding patch and their Update on the Update of the surrounding patch.

This is the same for stateful regions like ForEach [Reactive], only that the Update of the ForEach region doesn't get called automatically by the surrounding patch but gets called by the events of the incoming observable. More on that in this blog post: VL: Reactive Programming

There are many sources of observable events. For example Mouse, Keyboard and other input devices as well as AsyncTask or MidiIn. The timer nodes work in the same way. The output is an Observable that is on a new thread and either sends the frame number (for the system timer nodes) or a TimerClock (for the MultimediaTimer or BusyWaitTimer). A patch would look like this:

The use of observables also makes it easy to swap one timer for another if neccessary.

Basically there are 3 ways to setup timers in windows and now VL has them all!

System Timer

This is the most common timer but it usually only has a precision of 16ms. It can be used for recurring events when accuracy is not the most important issue and the interval is in the seconds range or a higher millisecond range. Nodes that use these timers are for example Interval and Timer in category Reactive:

Multimedia Timer

This is a dedicated timer for applications that do video or midi event playback. It is fairly accurate to about 1ms and doesn't need much CPU power. So it can be used for most time critical scenarios. To use this timer, make sure you enable the Experimental button in the VL node browser and create the node MultimediaTimer:

So that's nice, but it has two little draw backs. You can only specify the period in whole milliseconds and as you can see there is still some flickering in the measured period times. The flickering is well below 1ms but still, we can improve that:

Busy Wait Timer

Since its possible to measure time with high accuracy, one can write an infinite loop that always checks the time and executes an event once the specified interval time has passed. This timer always uses 100% of one CPU core because it checks time as often as it can. But hey, how many cores do you have these days? With this method you can achieve precision in the micro second range, which is insane!

If any patch processing is happening on the timer event, the power of your core is of course shared with the busy wait. Just make sure that the processing doesn't take longer as the specified period:

This timer has an option to reduce CPU load for period times that are higher than the accuracy of your system timer. You can specify a time span called Wait Accuracy. This is a time span before the desired end of the period that specifies when the busy wait phase should start. Before that time the timer is set to sleep for 1ms periodically. 16ms is a safe value, but you can decrease it until the Last Period starts to jump in order to reduce CPU load even more.

Threading

Both the MultimediaTimer and the BusyWaitTimer start their own background thread with priority AboveNormal. The thread priority setting might become an input pin in the future.

So now download latest alpha, enable the Experimental button in the VL node browser and give it a shot. If anything unexpected happens, let us know in the forums.

yours,
devvvvs

tonfilm, Wednesday, Apr 18th 2018 Digg | Tweet | Delicious 7 comments  

anonymous user login

Shoutbox

~4d ago

microdee: 2 seconds later: I asked before googling, but why do you need OS support for texture compression?

~4d ago

microdee: what's BC7?

~4d ago

antokhio: https://aka.ms/AA65g28 upvote pls for bc7 support in windows

~6d ago

joreg: PSA: forum is back up and running!

~6d ago

manuel: that shaderFX looks great

~6d ago

joreg: PSA: the forum is currently down for maintainance. if all goes well it will be back up shortly..